Osgood Schlatters Disease Fact Sheet

Whats is Osgood Schlatters Disease?

 

  • Osgood Schlatters Disease (OSD) is an overuse injury which is caused by high tension on the patella tendon (Tendon of the knee cap).
  • A localised pain generally occurs on the anterior (front) tibia tubercle, where the patella tendon inserts.
  • Stress within the growth plate of the tibia causes inflammation around the site.
  • Repetitive use on an unsettled and undeveloped growth plate causes microavulsions (small tears) on tubercle of the tibia.Osgood-Schlatter-disease-1024x664

 

Background/History of OSD:

OSD was found in 1903, where 2 surgeon’s named Robert Osgood (1873 – 1956) and Carl Schlatter (1864 – 1934) created and diagnosed the symptoms. Robert Osgood was a US Orthopedic Surgeon, and Carl Schlatter was a Swiss Surgeon. OSD until this day is named after them. (James R Gregory, MD)
OSD is commonly seen in actively adolescents who participate in high intense running, jumping or movements which require repetitive knee flexion. Its is likely to occur during puberty where children experience times of rapid growth. A typical age is boys between 13-15 years of age and girls between 11-13 years of age. (Whitmore, Amber PA-C)

 

Symptoms to look out for:

 

  • Localised swelling over “bony like prominence”(bump) at the front of the shin (below knee cap)
  • Tenderness where tendon attaches to tibia bone
  • Range of movement of knee may be normal, but slight discomfort below the knee cap can be expected when applying load through the leg
  • Redness below the knee cap
    (Whitmore, Amber PA-C)

 

Treatment/Prevention:

220px-MaleWithOsgoodSchlatter

Gregory J. et al explain in a study that there are no true detailed studies which evaluate the treatment of OSD, although conservative treatments are always recommended. These conservative treatments include:

  • Ice treatment over the site
  • Anti Inflammatories
  • A reduction in high intense, long duration or repetitive activities
  • Protective padding below the knee
  • Quadricep stretching
  • Quadricep and Hamstring strengthening
  • Rest in intervals
    (Gregory J. et al 2015)

 

This article was written by our sports therapist Aaron Trim.

Why not watch what Aaron has to say about himself by watching the video below.

 

 

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References:

James R Gregory, MD Assistant Professor, Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

Whitmore, Amber PA-C – Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants:
October 2013 – Volume 26 – Issue 10 – p 51–52 – Osgood Schlatter Disease

Image source : http://kneesafe.com/osgood-schlatter-disease/

Image source: Wikipedia -Osgood Schlatters Disease

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